Reading Between the Lines

… is a skill that we really should develop and hone as academics but is something I find difficult. I need to read every word in context and then usually twice (with particularly difficult concepts) in order to even begin to grasp the basics.

This means I am a very slow academic. Things take a long time to ‘happen’ as my nose is often buried far too deeply in a book to notice that time is flashing past and I haven’t written a word. It’s exacerbated by the fact that every time I read one thing I am exposed to numerous other ‘essential’ sources that have thus far eluded me … which ensures I often end up on an erogenous  erroneous book hunt ( Oh look … we are right back full circle to my good old friend Procrastination). My strap line should really read – the more I learn the less I seem to know! Too much knowledge is a dangerous thing – as is being intelligent enough to know how little intelligence you actually hold … I am beginning to wish I was born ignorant and blissful. I was most certainly conceived in blissful ignorance but that is a whole other blog post! 

So I am trying to read a little and write a lot, changing the old habit of reading oodles and writing in a panic! I have even changed my Facebook profile to a KEEP CALM AND KEEP WRITING notice … a good warning to those near and dear that I am in deed in the throws of giving birth to yet another piece of research.

Matters are never helped by libraries not holding books in stock. I am fortunate in that my institution is very generous to its grad students and we are allowed to order directly for the library (though it has to have approval), which can really cut out the middle man. I have already ordered up one set of books which prove to be a great help to my research and I have another on its way – though sadly it won’t arrive in time for this section but hopefully it will for the revisions later on. I understand the logistics in housing library collections, especially when it comes to specialist subjects but it can be frustrating to say the least to have to rely on inter-library loans and research trips. This week I found myself a victim of the distant learners curse. A library book I had out on loan was recalled, with all the sinister usual threats of heavy daily fines. I had to have it back in the library before 5 pm on Wednesday. Dutiful as I am I did as requested. Thursday morning I got another email informing me that a long awaited book from the British library was now available and I should collect it immediately, as it would need to be returned before the Christmas vacation and was also subject to immediate recall. I had little choice but to jump back in the car and complete yet another 40 mile round trip to collect said book! Again this inconvenience is ameliorated by the fact I don’t have to pay for Inter-library loans, and many grad students at other universities do, so I guess it is a small price to pay for such a service.

However this has caused a knock on effect – in that I now have book shelves groaning under the weight of books I have bought because they can be obtained cheaper in the internet than it costs me in petrol to get them from the library! Whoops!

I BLAME THE GOVERNMENT – because that’s what student’s do right?

I am also trying desperately trying to overcome the mental challenge of loathing Mondays – it is ridiculous really as I don’t have ‘weekends’ in the normal sense as I work to my own schedule and my partner works shifts, so why it should still loom ominously one each week is beyond me …

I know what will cure it – a bit of book therapy .. now where is that link for Abebooks … I am going on a book hunt! I guess I can always buy more shelves …

Past Lives

… are wonderful things to investigate, especially when those lives are so eloquently reported in such a periodical as Votes for Women.

I spent a marvellous few hours absorbed in the minutiae that was the weekly organ of the WSPU, laughing at the satirical cartoons, to rival Gyles, and the witty ‘court reports’ which regaled readers of suffragist exploits in the preceding week.

Regular features included protest reports and then follow-ons referring to the arrest and trial of those involved. One such protest, which was carried out on the 21st of November 1911, resulted in 232 arrests – all of which were carefully reported over four pages. The names of those arrested appeared like an honour roll each week … it really brought home what some women endured to give me (and all women) the power to have  a say in the way their country is run. It is such a shame that political apathy is so prevalent in young women today; they obviously feel very disconnected from the inequalities and oppression felt by their foremothers.

Amongst all of this reportage I found a large announcement referring to another magazine I am working on, which will prove useful in my discussion on rhetoric, as it stands apart, stylistically and tonally, from the rest of the newspaper. I had to transcribe it into type as taking images is not allowed unfortunately – a photocopy would have been wonderful However the binding was badly damaged and several leaves were loose and ragged. It smelt of years gone by and when I first began to turn the pages the dust from it caused me the wheeze a little.

After nearly six hours with no break or refreshment I left, having taken copious notes  – but plan on returning very soon for another forage. It was inspirational to be able to handle these age-worn editions personally. Often archival material is too fragile to touch (I have to say given the state of these I was surprised to be allowed access) so when you do get to manhandle some it is a very worthwhile experience.

The facilities at the NLS are pretty good, although the desks are a little high for typing on a laptop (or maybe the chairs are a little low?) so it can also be uncomfortable when working for long stretches. I am taking a cushion next time.